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Ranchers Discuss By A Tractor

Get behind the bipartisan effort to confront climate change

Land trusts have an opportunity to take action and join those who recognize that land conservation won’t be enough to slow down climate change fast enough, or with enough impact. As part of their pledge to conserve the living things upon the rocks, that comprise the land they protect, slowing down climate change is central to their missions.

The latest polling from the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication indicates that 77% of Americans support regulating carbon dioxide as a pollutant and that 68% support taxing fossil fuel companies while equally reducing other taxes.

There is growing bipartisan support. Your representatives could use some support and encouragement, just like they do for the Land and Water Conservation Fund. As the Land Trust Alliance points out, land trusts can advocate. It’s a matter of what’s important to your work and mission…

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Monarchs Drink From Petridish
LSU

It’s an Ecological Trap: Global warming can turn Monarch Butterflies’ favorite food into poison

“LSU researchers have discovered a new relationship between climate change, monarch butterflies and milkweed plants. It turns out that warming temperatures don’t just affect the monarch, Danaus plexippus, directly, but also affect this butterfly by potentially turning its favorite plant food into a poison.

Bret Elderd, associate professor in the LSU Department of Biological Sciences, and Mattnew Faldyn, a Ph.D. student in Elderd’s lab from Katy, Texas, published their findings today with coauthor Mark Hunter of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and School of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Michigan. This study is published in Ecology, a leading journal in this field…”

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Farmer Stress
Anthony Souffle

Mental health issues cropping up as financial stress continues on farms

“Organic dairy farmer Kevin Stuedemann knows how it feels to be on the verge of calling it quits.

After several producers in his area went out of business, Stuedemann’s milk buyer ended its contract with him on 30 days’ notice because there were no longer enough organic dairies nearby to justify sending a truck. With 70 cows producing milk, no customers and zero income, Stuedemann searched frantically for a new buyer and took an off-farm job to make ends meet…”

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GOP For Climate Change Discussions
Grist / Amelia Bates

Republicans embracing climate change

Young Republicans, reformed lobbyists, and green Tea Partiers: Meet America’s “eco-right.”

Tanner’s nonprofit, Conservation Hawks, is part of a coalition of grassroots organizations trying to pull conservatives into the conversation about rising temperatures.

And it’s starting to work. There’s a small but growing alliance of concerned conservatives who want to reclaim climate change as a nonpartisan issue. This motley crew of lobbyists, Evangelical Christians, and far-right radicals call themselves the “eco-right.”

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Yale Climate Change Opinions Map
Yale SCHOOL OF FORESTRY & ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Yale Climate Opinion Maps 2018

These maps show how Americans’ climate change beliefs, risk perceptions, and policy support vary at the state, congressional district, metro area, and county levels. Please see the most recent version of these maps here.

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Red Sunset
Flickr

A new study shows that more Utahns are discussing climate change

Researchers have produced a new interactive Climate Opinion Map that allows users to see people’s climate change opinions across the U.S.

What’s great about it is it’s relevant to anybody in any community across the country,” said Peter Howe, assistant professor of human-environment geography at Utah State University. “You know we make these numbers available all the way down to the county level.”

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Talk About Climate Change
Shutterstock via Grist

The most important thing you can do to fight global warming: End the climate “spiral of silence.”

Americans rarely talk about climate change—and they rarely hear about it in the media—a major new survey finds. But that silence reinforces the dangerously wrong notion that climate change isn’t an existential threat requiring urgent action.

There is good news. Land trusts are starting to help their supporters, and their communities, realize that the lands and waters they love are at stake—and that land conservation, while part of the solution, won’t be enough. I think you’ll appreciate the science to this changing approach…

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Paul Nicklen Releases A Wild Canadian Lynx That Has Been Fitted With A Radio Collar
Mark Sabourin

Making photography tell the stories: If we lose the ice, we lose the entire ecosystem’

As land conservationists, we say we think in a way that connects the dots, for generations to come. Climate change is testing that—to see if we really mean conservation in perpetuity.

You, like Paul, a former marine biologist, can inspire change and help people connect the dots in compelling ways as we face 30 years to slow down climate change in a way that will save the species we love, and the communities as we know them. Why? Because, as Paul notes…

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Mel Chin Unmoored
Portrait by Aundre Larrow. Artwork courtesy of the artist.

A dozen artistic responses to one of the greatest threats of our time

How could your land trust collaborate with artists in your community to make climate change relevant? Check out some examples...

Human-induced climate change, which certain politicians deny and many of us choose to ignore, threatens the survival of every species on Earth…

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Forest

Planting a mix of tree species ‘could double’ forest carbon storage

The new study, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, looks at one such question – “How could the number of tree species present in a forest affect its ability to store carbon?”

The results show that the most diverse forests are “faster” at storing carbon, says study co-author Professor Bernhard Schmid, a plant biologist from the University of Zurich.

“With increased species richness, more carbon is stored both above and below ground – in trunks, roots, deadwood, mould and soil. You can roughly say that a diverse forest stores twice the amount of carbon as the average monoculture.”

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