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Citizens Climate Lobby
Citizens Climate Lobby

Make Change Happen: “Environmental Voters Project” gets environmentalists, conservationists, to the polls

One of the ways your land trust could help slow down climate change—and help with a lot of other conservation work, like funding and protecting legislation for conservation—is to empower those that care.

You may not think of yourself as an environmentalist (and instead connect with the word “conservationist”) but the outside world probably has you tagged that way. That means this information could be for you—and/or your land trust.

The Citizen’s Climate Lobby is a very thoughtful, responsible, and strategic organization. You can join them—or learn from them—regardless of your actions to slow down climate change.

Here’s a case in point: “The good news is that 20.1 million Americans who are registered to vote identify climate change or other environmental issues as one of their top two priorities. These are ‘super-environmentalists,’ as the Environmental Voter Project calls them.

The bad news? ‘Environmentalists are disproportionately awful voters,’ Nathaniel says. Using public voting and polling data, the Environmental Voter Project breaks down the numbers of environmentalists who vote…”

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Fern Watch

Fern Watch

Just by monitoring the ferns on the forest floor, you can help League scientists learn how changes in climate may be affecting redwood forest habitats.

Help Save the Redwoods League track climate impacts in the coast redwood forest by observing Western sword fern (Polystichum munitum). This fern is common in the world’s tallest forests and responds quickly to increases or decreases in rainfall. You can help us track changes in these ferns in your local forest by joining our Fern Watch project through the free iNaturalist App. With your help we can locate habitat most buffered from climatic extremes and focus our conservation efforts in areas resilient to climate change.

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Western Snakeroot
Faerthen Felix

Contribute to Science

Every observation can contribute to biodiversity science, from the rarest butterfly to the most common backyard weed. We share your findings with scientific data repositories like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility to help scientists find and use your data. All you have to do is observe.

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Redwoods
Tim Christofferson

Redwoods in a changing climate

“Coast redwoods and giant sequoia have weathered many changes in their storied history, but the challenge of climate change is unprecedented. Climate change has the potential to affect nearly every corner of our natural landscape. Sea-level rise, drought, severe wildfire, extreme weather, and flooding – and the resulting impacts on wildlife and fauna have serious implications for conservation in California and beyond…”

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Citizen Science
Tonatiuh Trejo-Cantwell

Citizen science programs, iNaturalist app, makes climate change real

Through its citizen science programs, Redwood Watch and Fern Watch, the Save The Redwoods League (a land trust in California) works with community members to help study where redwood forest plants and animals live throughout the redwood range, and track changes in the forest over time, including climate impact.

The land trust has a variety of programs centered around climate change research and uses iNaturalist to help with community plant identification. Check out the fern watch program

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Donkey And Elephant With Mountain Backdrop
CUBoulder

Dems, GOP agree more than they think on climate change

Just how far apart are Republicans and Democrats when it comes to views on climate change?

Not nearly as far as most assume, according to new University of Colorado Boulder research that surveyed more than 2,000 adults.

“Despite what we often hear about the deep divisions between parties, we found that there is actually general agreement that climate change is real, that human activity causes climate change, and that we should do something about it,” said Leaf Van Boven, a psychology and neuroscience professor at CU Boulder and lead author of the study, published today in Perspectives on Psychological Science…

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Purple Flowers And Solar Panels
Rob Davis, Center for Pollinators in Energy

A regional land trust works to combat climate change with guidelines for building clean energy

Is your land trust, or community, working to re-think how it might start to proactively site, and promote, clean energy?

Scenic Hudson has developed siting and design principles for renewable energy development to help stakeholders find common ground in a regional model for increased renewable energy development that also protects natural and economic resources:

  • Prioritize development on previously disturbed areas
  • Protect agricultural lands and promote co-location
  • Protect natural beauty protect ecological resources
  • Protect historic and cultural resources
  • Maintain the purpose of conserved lands
  • Avoid and minimize new transmission and distribution lines
  • Use construction and operation best practices
  • Promote sustainable renewable energy development through planning and zoning

Perhaps your land trust or community would find these guidelines helpful.

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Ginnie Peters In Her Husbands Workshop. Matt Died In 2011.
Audra Mulkern

Why are America’s farmers killing themselves?

“It is dark in the workshop, but what light there is streams in patches through the windows. Cobwebs coat the wrenches, the cans of spray paint and the rungs of an old wooden chair where Matt Peters used to sit. A stereo plays country music, left on by the renter who now uses the shop…”

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Farm Landscape

Michigan farmers, residents, praise wind power

Farmers are committing suicide in record numbers—in the US and around the world. Crop and water disasters are a major part of this, resulting in loss of income, massive debt, and unending despair. For some, “farming energy” with solar and wind, along with more traditional agricultural products, may avoid the unhappy reality of selling for development.

“For those committed to farmland conservation programs, Mills said, wind farms and wind turbines help keep farmers living on their farm lands, help attract and retain younger people, and help provide diversified funding streams…”

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AUSTIN ALLRED
photo courtesy of Austin Allred

This farmer turns manure into clean water and it may be the future of farming

Austin Allred is so devoted to dairy farming that he switched over to it after growing up as a crop farmer. He now runs Royal Dairy, located in central Washington, where cows are a powerful tool in an astonishing process that creates bio-rich soil and clean irrigation water while cutting down greenhouse gases.

That’s because as much as Royal Dairy cares about what goes into the cows, visitors will quickly realize that their operation is equally concerned with what comes out of them…

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