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Climate Change & Conservation eNews

Communications

Paul Nicklen Releases A Wild Canadian Lynx That Has Been Fitted With A Radio Collar
Mark Sabourin

Making photography tell the stories: If we lose the ice, we lose the entire ecosystem’

As land conservationists, we say we think in a way that connects the dots, for generations to come. Climate change is testing that—to see if we really mean conservation in perpetuity.

You, like Paul, a former marine biologist, can inspire change and help people connect the dots in compelling ways as we face 30 years to slow down climate change in a way that will save the species we love, and the communities as we know them. Why? Because, as Paul notes…

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Mel Chin Unmoored
Portrait by Aundre Larrow. Artwork courtesy of the artist.

A dozen artistic responses to one of the greatest threats of our time

How could your land trust collaborate with artists in your community to make climate change relevant? Check out some examples...

Human-induced climate change, which certain politicians deny and many of us choose to ignore, threatens the survival of every species on Earth…

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Forest

Planting a mix of tree species ‘could double’ forest carbon storage

The new study, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, looks at one such question – “How could the number of tree species present in a forest affect its ability to store carbon?”

The results show that the most diverse forests are “faster” at storing carbon, says study co-author Professor Bernhard Schmid, a plant biologist from the University of Zurich.

“With increased species richness, more carbon is stored both above and below ground – in trunks, roots, deadwood, mould and soil. You can roughly say that a diverse forest stores twice the amount of carbon as the average monoculture.”

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Blue And Yellow Clouds Windmills
REUTERS/David McNew

How to talk about climate change: 5 tips from the front lines

“Greenhouse gas emissions need to decrease fast if we are to have any chance of keeping global temperature rises below dangerous levels, and it is hard to see how this will happen without greater, and more urgent, engagement with society.

We need more people talking about climate change more often, because we need to break out of the current climate echo chamber.

However, many people feel under-equipped to do this. If that is you, these five tips may help you over this barrier. They are the result of both my own experience, and lessons from behavioural experts…”

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Flooding Around Barn

Addressing climate grief makes you a badass, not a snowflake

With the fires, floods, extreme storms and loss of life, climate grief is real and there are ways to cope. Students are grappling with this too. “Direct engagement with today’s biggest challenges is, nevertheless, the path many of today’s students are choosing to follow. That doesn’t make them snowflakes. It makes them badasses…”

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Western Snakeroot
Faerthen Felix

Contribute to Science

Every observation can contribute to biodiversity science, from the rarest butterfly to the most common backyard weed. We share your findings with scientific data repositories like the Global Biodiversity Information Facility to help scientists find and use your data. All you have to do is observe.

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Hank Stone Uses Compost On His Rangelands
UC Davis

A climate change solution beneath our feet

The roots run deep for Scott Stone at Yolo Land & Cattle Company outside Winters, California. His late father, Hank Stone, bought the 7,500-acre ranch about 40 years ago, and it’s now owned and operated by Scott and his brother Casey.

Stone is as much a natural resources manager as a rancher, with a protective eye on the ranch’s watersheds, trees, pasture and grass-fed cattle, and a genuine desire to leave the land better than he found it…

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Sunset Over Grassland
Getty Images

Grasslands more reliable carbon sink than trees

Unlike forests, grasslands sequester most of their carbon underground, while forests store it mostly in woody biomass and leaves. When wildfires cause trees to go up in flames, the burned carbon they formerly stored is released back to the atmosphere. When fire burns grasslands, however, the carbon fixed underground tends to stay in the roots and soil, making them more adaptive to climate change…

“In a stable climate, trees store more carbon than grasslands,” said co-author Houlton, director of the John Muir Institute of the Environment at UC Davis. “But in a vulnerable, warming, drought-likely future, we could lose some of the most productive carbon sinks on the planet… We really need to start thinking about the vulnerably of the ecosystem carbon, and use this information to de-risk our carbon investment and conservation strategies in the 21st century”…

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Donkey And Elephant With Mountain Backdrop
CUBoulder

Dems, GOP agree more than they think on climate change

Just how far apart are Republicans and Democrats when it comes to views on climate change?

Not nearly as far as most assume, according to new University of Colorado Boulder research that surveyed more than 2,000 adults.

“Despite what we often hear about the deep divisions between parties, we found that there is actually general agreement that climate change is real, that human activity causes climate change, and that we should do something about it,” said Leaf Van Boven, a psychology and neuroscience professor at CU Boulder and lead author of the study, published today in Perspectives on Psychological Science…

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Ginnie Peters In Her Husbands Workshop. Matt Died In 2011.
Audra Mulkern

Why are America’s farmers killing themselves?

“It is dark in the workshop, but what light there is streams in patches through the windows. Cobwebs coat the wrenches, the cans of spray paint and the rungs of an old wooden chair where Matt Peters used to sit. A stereo plays country music, left on by the renter who now uses the shop…”

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