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Therapy Online
Michael Hession

Anxious about the climate future? Seen a climate-aware therapist lately?

This month was hard. So was last month. And the month before that. In fact, we are going to have to support each other as we collectively work to find and implement solutions on a personal, local, state, and national level. Yet, to do so, we also have to acknowledge that it's OK not to be OK, and to find ways to cope.

As climate psychologists will attest, we are living through an epoch of collective environmental trauma, and subsequent climate distress. Even for those among that increasingly shrinking number who are less-than-concerned, the distress of living in an increasingly unpredictable, hostile world will inevitably influence their daily lives. Acknowledging one’s feelings about climate change challenges, and talking about them not only benefits individuals and groups, but may spur broader climate engagement…

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Megan
Judy Anderson

The antidote to climate dread

As folks who care about wildlife, agriculture, and our communities, the reality of climate change is increasingly distressing. We need to help each other find hope, and ways to take meaningful action. See if this is something you could share with others.

There have long been concerns in the climate science community about possible public “fatigue” at being bombarded with dire news of the worsening climate, and having this lead to widespread dread or overwhelm, which can create an emotional barrier to actually taking action.

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Solar Panels
AEN

Why put a price on carbon?

We are going to need to promote energy conservation incentives and renewable energy if we are to save the species we all cherish. That means advocating for dual-use, compatible renewables like wind and solar.

It also might mean that you encourage your local and regional conservation groups to support the Citizen Climate Lobby’s work on bipartisan efforts to put a price on carbon pollution…and then talk about why they are doing that.

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Beetle Kill
Unsplash

How the climate crisis and pests are impacting four tree species in Vermont’s woods

Whether you live in the northeast or other parts of the U.S., we are seeing the impacts of climate change on our region's forests. Conserving them is part of the solution — and sharing articles like this might help people understand the importance of slowing down climate change.

The human-induced climate crisis — compounded by global trade patterns that invite non-native pests — may present the greatest challenge to forest management yet. Vermont is becoming warmer and wetter, creating conditions that benefit insects and diseases capable of wiping out a species.

While a single threat might not be enough to bring down a tree, compounding pressures can. Less-than-ideal soil conditions, for example, might stress a tree but not kill it. But that stress could make the tree more vulnerable to an insect, drought, or herd of browsing deer…

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TED By USU

TED Talk: Redefining climate change denial

With the need to connect with people around climate solutions, and to diversify the conservation sector's approach to climate action, this TED Talk might be something you want to share.

By recognizing the passive forms of climate change denial in our everyday lives, we enable ourselves to move past them and begin working towards climate solutions each day. Patrick Belmont has some very interesting observations about different kinds of deniers.

Belmont is a dad and river scientist with a rapidly shrinking carbon footprint. He talks about climate change in real terms, and real impacts, including ecosystems, national security, and human suffering. When you listen, you will hear about equity, planting trees, and the urgency of time, and what we can do about it.

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Pitched Roof Solar
Mendocino Land Trust

Moving forward, going solar

Check out this post from a while back; it's as relevant as ever. Partnerships or local collaborations can be a great way to inspire folks to take action. Can you think of partnerships like this in your community?

If this is the year you finally want to go solar, give Mendocino Solar Service a call. Not only will they be happy to answer all of your questions and set up a free on site consultation, but if you mention the Mendocino Land Trust, Mendocino Solar will make a $500 donation to MLT upon the completed installation of your 3 kW or larger solar photovoltaic system! What could be better?…

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Mendocino Smiles
Mendocino Land Trust

Climate change and care

Your local land trust can help talk about climate change by showing solutions and connecting around issues that people care about. People are looking to land trusts to make it clear that we have to act now—and how to do that creatively and thoughtfully.

Rising sea-level? Weird weather patterns of droughts and flooding? Violent storms? Is it true that large portions of the Antarctic ice shelves are collapsing into the ocean? Are glaciers really melting at an unprecedented rate? Even if true, there’s little we can do about such global phenomena, right?

These changes, associated with the heating of the earth’s atmosphere through the burning of fossil fuels, are really happening. Climate change is real. And the Mendocino Land Trust takes exception to the idea that little can be done in the face of climate change…

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Yellow Warbler
Shutterstock

Free 3-week series for land trusts to address climate change

Even if you aren't located in Wisconsin, this free 3-week series on climate change could be a good opportunity to consider natural climate solutions to climate change.

Addressing climate change is a high priority among Wisconsin land trusts. In this three-week series, explore roles your land trust can play in slowing climate change and adapting to changes that we are already seeing on the landscape.

Sessions topics: 
Framing the challenges and opportunities; leveraging tools for climate resilience strategies; developing carbon markets

In order to maximize your learning experience, they recommend you sign up and participate in all three sessions. Get the most out of the learning cohort, including resources for learning between sessions.

Session information:
Cost: FREE
Dates: Thursdays February 18, February 25, and March 4, 2021
Time: 1:30–3:00 p.m. CST

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Climate Change Sign Holders
Shutterstock

Black Lives Matter in the climate movement

Land trusts all over the country pledged to address racism and make their lands, and community, welcoming places for all. Yet many aren't thinking about how climate change will impact those who have been disenfranchised in their community. This coming year is a great time to consider that—and talk about solutions.

We have come to a time when the United States is having yet another reckoning with racist institutions that have pervaded since its founding. Corporations, sports teams, and brands alike have been publicly re-evaluating their policies to declare how they stand with the Black community.

While preliminary policy changes are a start, what is really needed is a more thorough investigation of what it means to be anti-racist.  Especially for corporations, anti-racism should also be incorporated into climate change mitigation efforts. While it may seem that climate change activism has taken a backseat in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and the Black Lives Matter Movement, how we address these issues can help forge a path forward for the climate movement…

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Grateful Little Girl
Chelsea Carroll

They’re climate scientists. They’re mothers. Now they’re joining the battle to get Americans to act

Very few people in the U.S. hear about climate change and climate solutions. A new $10-million campaign ad program will put climate scientists who are mothers in the living rooms of families across the country, so they can speak to parents like them. The campaign, called "Science Moms," will include TV and digital advertising and will run in Pennsylvania, Colorado, and Florida.

“Those of us who understand climate change are disappointed by gridlock on the issue,” said Emily Fischer, a climate scientist at Colorado State University, who narrated the 90-second spot featuring her daughters enjoying the outdoors. “The goal of Science Moms is to push through that—to reach directly to mothers and let them know this is a threat to their kids. The kids they make sandwiches for, the kids who crawl into their beds at night, the kids who drive them crazy sometimes. To those kids. Not someone else’s kids…”

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