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Conservation Hawks

Organization to know: Conservation Hawks

When we think about who is taking action to slow down climate change, we often don't consider those who hunt and fish. That's why I want to make sure you know about Conservation Hawks. As a national group, they are working to inspire climate action while there's still time to save the plants and animals they love.

We are a group of passionate hunters & anglers devoted to protecting our sporting heritage and passing on a healthy natural world to our kids and grandkids. Our motto says it all:  Hunters & Anglers Defending Our Future.

What makes us different? At Conservation Hawks, our job is to identify and address the single biggest threat to our hunting & fishing. That’s why we focus all our time & energy on the most important issue for sportsmen:  Climate Change.

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Pope
REUTERS/Henry Nicholls

World’s top three Christian leaders in climate appeal ahead of U.N. summit

Land trusts have been working with religious organizations to conserve their lands. There is an opportunity to move beyond the transaction of land protection and continue a partnership to encourage a larger effort to enhance energy conservation efforts, compatible renewables, and natural climate solutions — such as urban farming, and wildlife and agricultural corridors.

In “A Joint Message for the Protection of Creation,” Pope Francis, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, and Orthodox Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew asked Christians to pray that world leaders at the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow in November make courageous choices.

“We call on everyone, whatever their belief or world view, to endeavour to listen to the cry of the earth and of people who are poor, examining their behaviour and pledging meaningful sacrifices for the sake of the earth which God has given us,” the message said…

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Therapy Online
Michael Hession

Anxious about the climate future? Seen a climate-aware therapist lately?

This month was hard. So was last month. And the month before that. In fact, we are going to have to support each other as we collectively work to find and implement solutions on a personal, local, state, and national level. Yet, to do so, we also have to acknowledge that it's OK not to be OK, and to find ways to cope.

As climate psychologists will attest, we are living through an epoch of collective environmental trauma, and subsequent climate distress. Even for those among that increasingly shrinking number who are less-than-concerned, the distress of living in an increasingly unpredictable, hostile world will inevitably influence their daily lives. Acknowledging one’s feelings about climate change challenges, and talking about them not only benefits individuals and groups, but may spur broader climate engagement…

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Soil Health
Alexandre Family Farm

Nation’s first regenerative dairy works with nature to heal soil — at scale

If agriculture is important in your region, this is the type of story that might be worth sharing — and talking about how it could be important to support agriculture in being part of the climate solution.

At a time when large dairy brands are experimenting with scaling up regenerative practices, Alexandre Family Farm is working to set the standard for the future of the industry…

The couple currently farm on about 9,000 acres (up from 560 acres when they first bought the ranch) with 8,000 head of cattle, including 4,500 mature cows, spread across four locations. All of their cows are on pasture after 5 months of age and the entire land gets grazed eight to nine times per year…

More than a dozen Northeastern dairies (all small-scale, with 100 – 150 cows) are currently going through the ROC certification process, Whitlow says, and the hope is that once those are announced, “it’ll show what’s possible”…

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Paul Marotta/Getty Images

Harvard says fighting climate change is a top priority. But it still won’t divest from fossil fuels.

Institutions are beginning to take action against climate change. "For years, Harvard resisted calls to cut off funding for oil and gas firms despite demands from many students, alumni, and outside advocates."

“Harvard University prides itself on being on the cutting edge of climate policy and research. Its students and faculty have deployed drones over the Amazon, worked on a “bionic leaf” to turn sunlight and water into fuel and fertilizer, and searched for a cheaper electrochemical method of capturing carbon dioxide.

But there’s at least one step on climate change that Harvard has not taken: divesting the university’s $39 billion endowment of investments in fossil fuels.”

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Vox

Harvard, America’s richest university, will divest from fossil fuels

When your land trust or community organizations divest from fossil fuels, it's important to talk about why. Most will stress the moral and climate imperative. It's also helpful to talk about avoiding "stranded assets" and ensuring that conservation organizations have a strong footing for future generations.

The action is likely to have ripple effects in higher education and beyond, given Harvard’s $41 billion endowment and its iconic status among American institutions. For years, Harvard resisted calls to cut off funding for oil and gas firms despite demands from many students, alumni, and outside advocates.

“We must act now as citizens, as scholars, and as an institution to address this crisis on as many fronts as we have at our disposal,” Harvard President Larry S. Bacow said recently in a statement to the university community…

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World On Fire
Mark Garlick / Getty Images

What we know: The reality, risks, and response to climate change

"At Conservation Hawks, our job is to identify and address the single biggest threat to our hunting and fishing. That’s why we focus all our time and energy on the most important issue for sportsmen: Climate Change."

“The overwhelming evidence of human-caused climate change documents both current impacts with significant costs and extraordinary future risks to society and natural systems. The scientific community has convened conferences, published reports, spoken out at forums and proclaimed, through statements by virtually every national scientific academy and relevant major scientific organization — including the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) — that climate change puts the well-being of people of all nations at risk.”

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World On Fire
SOREN HALD/GETTY IMAGES

Why psychology should be a part of the fight against climate change

There have long been concerns in the climate science community about possible public “fatigue” at being bombarded with dire news of the worsening climate, and having this lead to widespread dread or overwhelm, which can create an emotional barrier to actually taking action.

“Climate change isn’t just a political, social and economic issue. It’s also a deeply psychological one — and now, behavioral scientists are using psychology to better understand the complex relationship between people and nature.”

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Megan
Judy Anderson

The antidote to climate dread

As folks who care about wildlife, agriculture, and our communities, the reality of climate change is increasingly distressing. We need to help each other find hope, and ways to take meaningful action. See if this is something you could share with others.

There have long been concerns in the climate science community about possible public “fatigue” at being bombarded with dire news of the worsening climate, and having this lead to widespread dread or overwhelm, which can create an emotional barrier to actually taking action.

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Saving Us Book Cover

Good read: Katharine Hayhoe’s “Saving Us”

Check out Katharine Hayhoe's new book, "Saving Us: A Climate Scientist's Case for Hope and Healing in a Divided World."

“When it comes to climate impacts and climate action, there is a narrow path between despair and hope.”

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