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Fire
Creative Commons

Wildfires growing, temperature soaring around the world

I recommend you watch this short interview he had with CNN this week about the extreme weather and the connections between climate change, its drivers, and what can be done. It might be something you can share with friends, family, and colleagues.

Dr. Mann is a climate scientist who, in addition to his ground-breaking research, is also a widely-respected climate communicator. See what you think about his interview with CNN.

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Mushrooms
iStock

Four things to know about fungi “Climate Warriors”

This could be something to share with folks, as you talk about the importance of forest conservation and climate change.

Fungi represent an entire kingdom of life on Earth. When you think of fungi you might visualize mushrooms in something you eat, or mushrooms that pop up along the forest floor. But some fungi, called mycorrhizal fungi, can exist entirely underground, growing symbiotically with the roots of trees.

These fungi may not be visible to us, but our research group has found that these mycorrhizal fungi are doing us a huge climate favor behind the scenes. These fungi are climate change warriors, helping forests absorb CO2 pollution, delaying the effects of global warming, and protecting our planet.

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Elephanthead
iStock

As climate shifts, species will need to relocate, and people may have to help them

Land conservationists talk a lot about native species, and require native species as part of their conservation efforts. But what is native in a shifting climate? How might this perspective and language need to change?

Climate change is already affecting plants and animals worldwide and is a growing threat to biodiversity, adding a new layer to the existing challenges of habitat loss, invasive species, pollution, and overexploitation. A new study surveyed the recommendations of scientists for managing biodiversity in the face of climate change, providing a summary of practical guidance and identifying areas in need of further research…

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Fall Scene
iStock

Carbon offsets, illustrated

Authentic carbon offsets require going beyond what trees, wetlands, prairies, and farmlands are already doing. That means either managing the land differently or ensuring that unprotected land is conserved and managed to be part of the solution.

The Nature Conservancy has provided a brief guide to one of the climate solutions we need in order to achieve a low-carbon future, faster: natural climate solutions.

They note that we need to cut emissions from fossil fuels and reduce excess carbon dioxide and other planet-warming gases soon, to avoid the worst of the climate change impacts. This might be something you could share with those who are interested in authentic carbon offsets.

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Ducks
iStock

River conservation corridor

This might be a good project to share with donors, community members, and regional leaders to see how it could be replicated in your area.

The East Branch of the Little Calumet River Conservation Corridor Project has helped to accelerate the preservation, restoration, and water quality improvement efforts within an ecologically significant riparian area. Project goals have included land acquisition, prioritization of acquisitions, collaborative land management planning, ecological restoration, identification of green infrastructure opportunities, and evaluation of policy mechanisms and barriers…

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Deschutes People
Jay Mather

Climate change: Impacts on the communities we love

Natural climate solutions are something land trusts are comfortable with. It's core to what they've been working on for years. Now, however, there is growing urgency to increase the pace.

Central Oregon has some incredible towns, whether it’s the breweries, restaurants, bike paths, or people living there. While we often focus on how climate change is affecting the natural areas around us, it’s also impacting our communities. Learn more about what we can expect from climate change in the communities we love.

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Deschutes Places
Tyler Roemer

Climate change: Impacts on the places we love

Natural climate solutions are something land trusts are comfortable with. It's core to what they've been working on for years. Now, however, there is growing urgency to increase the pace.

Most people live in Central Oregon because of the immense beauty of its natural places. Our mountains, forests, lakes, streams, and sagebrush steppe habitats are all being altered by climate change. These impacts have begun to affect ecosystems across our region, and the impacts of climate change on animals, plants, and habitats are all interconnected. Learn more about what’s happening now and what we can expect to happen in the future to our loved places.

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Deschutes Kids
Jay Mather

Climate change strategy

Natural climate solutions are something land trusts are comfortable with. It's core to what they've been working on for years. Now, however, there is growing urgency to increase the pace.

Land trusts are talking about climate change more and more in a solution-based, and authentic, manner. Here’s an excerpt from the Deschutes Land Trust website about climate change:

“What does climate change have to do with the Land Trust?

It’s pretty simple: climate change threatens the Land Trust’s core mission of protecting land for wildlife, scenic views, and local communities in perpetuity. In that regard, responding to climate change is like an insurance policy for land trusts.

As a conservation organization, the Land Trust can substantially contribute to mitigating the effects of climate change on local natural areas and can help facilitate the ability of fish and wildlife to adapt to altered landscapes. Learn more about how climate change impacts the places we love and the communities we love…”

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Trees
iStock

Why keeping mature forests intact is key to the climate fight

Biofuels like wood, at a large scale, are increasingly understood as problematic for climate change, as well as for wildlife habitat, and water quality issues, that large-scale efforts entail.

Preserving mature forests can play a vital role in removing CO2 from the atmosphere, says policy scientist William Moomaw. In an e360 interview, he talks about the importance of existing forests and why the push to cut them for fuel to generate electricity is misguided…

In an interview, they talk about the challenge in general, what’s happening in the Southeastern U.S., and the wood pellet and biomass-burning industry that is driving the deforestation. They also share what can be done about it…

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Fall
iStock

Study: Drought determining tree height and diameter growth

The timing of drought also affects which tree species are more vulnerable, according to the findings of this study, published in the journal Annals of Botany PLANTS.

Droughts interact with tree phenology to drive declines in growth. As climate change makes drought more likely in the Northeastern USA, it is important to understand how droughts at different times of year will lead to reduced height and diameter growth of trees…

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