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Tree Overlook
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Land restoration for carbon sequestration

As climate change stresses natural systems, and invasives become increasingly challenging to control, it's going to be an ongoing strategy adjustment to clarify what, where, and how we are going to manage natural lands.

Striving to restore these affected areas back to their Native Plant Community type helps provide high-quality habitat for native plants and wildlife, helps protect uncommon and endangered species populations in the state, and protects vital essential ecosystem services such as clean water, clean air, and carbon sequestration.

The Minnesota Land Trust conducts three common types of restoration projects across the state: prairie restoration, wetland restoration, and woody invasives removal…

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Forest
Wikimedia

Buffam Brook Community Forest

Bounded by Buffam, Boyden, and North Valley Roads, this 289-acre Town of Pelham conservation land consists of the Clifford E. Lippincott Conservation Area enhanced by five parcels that were added between 2017-2019 with funding from the U.S. Forest Service Community Forest Program, which supports local acquisition of land to create a publicly owned forest that is managed for the educational, recreational and economic benefit of the community.

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Forest
Wikimedia

Kestrel Land Trust acquires 161 acres of “core area” in Pelham, Mass.

This project is the culmination of years of work between the landowners, Kestrel Land Trust and the Town of Pelham to protect this important landscape, which supports endangered species habitat, local water quality, and climate change resilience.

The Kestrel Land Trust and the Town of Pelham Conservation Commission have acquired a 161-acre parcel of land in Pelham, Mass., that will serve as a valuable natural asset for both people and wildlife. The Buffam Brook Community Forest, which lies within a high priority terrestrial “core area” in the Connect the Connecticut landscape conservation design, will be a publicly owned forest managed for the educational, recreational, and economic benefit of the community, thanks to collaboration with several private woodland owners.

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Kids In Nature
Kestral Land Trust

New community forest promotes climate change resilience

The Town of Pelham Conservation Commission and Kestrel Land Trust recently announced the acquisition of 161-acres of woodlands from private owners to create the Buffam Brook Community Forest, west of the Quabbin Reservoir, the second of its kind in the State of Massachusetts. The Community Forest and Open Space Program is a United States Forest Service Grant that funds local acquisition of land to create a publicly owned forest that is managed for the educational, recreational and economic benefit of the community.

This project is the culmination of years of work between the landowners, Kestrel Land Trust and the Town of Pelham to protect this important landscape, which supports endangered species habitat, local water quality, and climate change resilience.

[Note: You can find additional information here]

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Forest Floor
Judy Anderson

Working Woodlands Program

Are you interested in assisting landowners with climate management goals? This is a good example of how being helpful and welcoming can inspire greater change. Make sure you follow the state and federal funding discussions in case there are resources to help land trusts initiate similar programs. Foundations, companies, and donors might be interested in supporting this effort, too.

The principle behind Working Woodlands is simple: landowners agree to manage their forests sustainably in return for conservation and management assistance with improving the value and the health of their land.

Specifically, TNC works with landowners to analyze a property’s potential as wildlife habitat and for fighting climate change. In return, participating landowners receive…

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Natural Barrier
Shutterstock

Forget massive seawalls, coastal wetlands offer the best storm protection money can buy

If you, your friends, family, and/or your local land trust is facing coastal climate stress, this article might be helpful to share — and then link to what is happening, or could happen, in your area.

Preserving and restoring coastal wetlands is a very cost-effective strategy for society, and can significantly increase well-being for humans and the rest of nature.

With the frequency and intensity of tropical cyclones and other extreme weather events projected to further increase, the value of coastal wetlands will increase in the future. This justifies investing much more in their conservation and restoration…

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Saplings in plastic
MediaWorldImages/Alamy Stock Photo/Alamy

Trees should be planted without plastic guards, says UK study

Are you thinking through how you can model less reliance on plastic and fossil fuels?

Darren Moorcroft, chief executive of the Woodland Trust, said: “As one of the nation’s largest tree planters, by committing to go plastic-free in terms of the use of tree shelters, we are set to be the trailblazers in this field – catalysing a permanent change to the tree-planting world.”

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Forest
Judy Anderson

Assisted migration aims to help forests — and people — adapt to a swiftly changing climate

There is a changing perspective on the need to help species migrate. It's not something everyone is comfortable with, yet, but the science is mounting in this direction. Land trusts are going to need to keep evaluating "what is native," how to slow down climate change, and the best practices to strategically conserve lands and waters.

“Models predict that natural migration rates of tree species will likely not be able to keep up with the rapid pace of climate change,” said Heidi Asbjornsen, associate professor of natural resources and the environment at the UNH College of Life Sciences and Agriculture.”

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Coast
Pixabay

The future value of ecosystem services: Global scenarios and national implications

Preserving and restoring coastal wetlands is a very cost-effective strategy for society, and can significantly increase well-being for humans and the rest of nature.

“Ecosystem services are a major contributor to sustainable human wellbeing…”

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Gorgeous Old Growth
Jurgen Hess

Warming reduces trees’ ability to slow climate change

Now, more than ever, responding to the climate crisis necessitates thinking about land conservation and community engagement differently. We need to be honest and authentic with our communities and supporters about what's at stake and how natural climate solutions could lose much of their power to make meaningful change.

“Trees are carbon sinks — they absorb more carbon dioxide than they emit. But according to new National Science Foundation-funded research, the most prolific tree in North America, the Douglas fir, will absorb less atmospheric carbon dioxide in the future and therefore do less to slow climate change.”

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